The next couple of reviews are based around an exploration of Irish “single pot still whiskey” I did some weeks back. It’s a style I have been drawn to of late and the historical elements are just as fascinating.

The journey starts with Power’s, it’s a brand that is likely not as well known as the now ubiquitous Jameson but it was part of what was known as the “Big Four”. These were the four main houses that would come to dominate the then booming Irish whisky industry.

From what I can gather the original James Power distillery was founded a bit later than some of it’s eventual peers. 1791 is the year the label states and that was when the original still located in the public house owned by James Power came online. They moved to a site on John’s Lane around 1822 and that’s were the real money moves started paying off following the passing of 1823’s Excise act.

What’s important to acknowledge is that the Irish distilleries of the time were among the biggest in the world in the later 1800’s the we’re cranking out millions of gallons of spirit and what they produced had a good reputation. The robust flavour of their whisky made from a mash of barley, malt and other grains was what build their empire and it was their steadfast refusal to start blending down their whiskys and adapting that ultimately caused their downfall.

Inside the old John’s Lane still house, massive direct fired stills.

Despite the best efforts of the Powers clan, the “Big Four” eventually consolidated under one large umbrella as Irish Distillers Limited and closed all their respective distilleries in order to build one major facility that would supply all of the grain and pot-still whisky in Ireland.

Since then under the power of Pernod Ricard and loads of marketing on the lifestyle brand that is Jameson, Irish whisky has risen from the ashes Phoenix like with Midleton resurrecting many of IDL’s old brands and playing the historical angle quite hard. The Power’s brand is still somewhat of an underdog in comparison to say Redbreast or the spot line-up but several of it’s releases especially the 12 year old John’s lane have attracted the whisky geeks.

Signature release is a strange one, It first caught my attention because it’s priced quite affordably (under 60$) and at 46% ABV. Compare that to both Green Spot and Redbreast 12 who both retail for around (80$) and are both bottled at 40% ABV. It is also predominantly vatted from refill ex-bourbon casks with a few ex-sherry, so I figured it should be a clean style from which to make comparisons on the more cask influenced extension lines.


Nose: Powdered sugar, talcum, sweet confectionery notes like jujubes and gummy candies. There is a slight varnish sharpness, that gives way to dry grains and oak shavings. It comes out of the gate ready to fight but if you give it time you’ll get more. Candied pineapple, green apple a touch of wax, vanilla buttercream and some grassy notes.


PalateOily, creamy and a bit sharp. Peaches and cream oatmeal, very oily, loads of grain, unripe fruit like kiwi & pears. There’s also a touch of dried fruit. 


FinishSweet, sharp astringent, vanilla, coconut or mineral oil & tinned pineapples.There is a kind of yeasty quality (from the sherry cask perhaps?) and some cake batter.


Notes: This one bites back a little, it still has some asperities that might lead many to dismiss it as green or not quite there. Yet it’s got charm in abundance and the strength is just right for delivering those flavours. The bottle really blooms once it’s been open for a while

Power’s Signature 

46%ABV

86/100


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